09/25/2018

Patrick Akos

pakos@unc.edu

 

Dr. Akos' professional experiences as a teacher, school and college counselor inform his work as

a Professor in the School of Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Patrick

teaches in several programs (e.g., School Psychology, Ph.D., School Counseling MEd,

Education Minor, Thrive@Education) and has served his school (e.g., Faculty Chair), University

(e.g, Leadership Fellow at the Institute of Arts and Humanities), state (e.g., Reach

Higher/College Access Strategic Planning Team), national associations (e.g., Board of Directors

of the American School Counseling Association) and international collaborations (e.g.,

Transformative Change: Educational and Life Transitions Research Centre (TCELT) in

Scotland) in a variety of leadership roles. He is as National Certified Counselor and School

Counselor, Approved Clinical Supervisor, Licensed Professional Counselor in North Carolina,

and a licensed secondary and middle grades teacher and K-12 school counselor in North

Carolina.

 

 

Patrick’s primary focus is on research/scholarship. Strengths-Based School Counseling (Galassi

& Akos, 2007) is the theoretical frame he utilizes for inquiry and practice. The strengths

framework is based in humanistic traditions, and is empirically supported by contemporary

scholarship (e.g., positive youth development, non-cognitive factors). Generally, Patrick seeks to

understand how policy and practice shape empowering systems and help people thrive. His

primary focus is navigating transitions across the lifespan. For example, normative school

transitions (e.g., moving from elementary to middle school) involve the developmental intensity

and asynchrony of early adolescence, cultural identity development, as well as stage environment

fit in multiple contexts. Similarly, college and career transitions depend on talents,

meaning making, agency and opportunity structures.

 

 

Overall, Patrick endeavors to lead, teach and serve others consistent with a strengths orientation.

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